The three body problem

The Three Body Problem Cixin Liu: The Three-Body Problem 1

Die drei Sonnen ist ein Science-Fiction-Roman des chinesischen Autors Liu Cixin. Die Originalausgabe erschien zunächst in Fortsetzungen in der Zeitschrift Science Fiction World und wurde in Buchform publiziert; eine deutsche Übersetzung. '[The Three-Body Problem and The Dark Forest are] the works of fiction I am most enthusiastic about' Bloomberg. 'For a book that makes you think, and holds true. The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth's Past Book 1) (English Edition​) eBook: Liu, Cixin, Liu, Ken: susannenygards.se: Kindle-Shop. Die drei Sonnen (chinesisch 三體 / 三体, Pinyin Sān tǐ – „Drei (Himmels-)Körper“) ist ein und zur bereits erschienenen englischen Übersetzung („The Three Body Problem“, zu dt. also „Das Dreikörperproblem“) greift der deutsche Titel. The Redemption of Time: A Three-Body Problem Novel (Remembrance of Baoshu · out of 5 stars Kindle Edition. $

the three body problem

'[The Three-Body Problem and The Dark Forest are] the works of fiction I am most enthusiastic about' Bloomberg. 'For a book that makes you think, and holds true. Über eBooks bei Thalia ✓»The Three-Body Problem / The Remembrance of Earth's Past 1«von Cixin Liu & weitere eBooks online kaufen & direkt. Head of Zeus Liu, Cixin: The Three-Body Problem The Three-Body Problem 1 jetzt online kaufen bei Letzshop ✓ Im Geschäft in Luxemburg vorrätig ✓ Online. Andernfalls werden die Einwohner von Trisolaris die Erde lokalisieren können und letztendlich erobern. Kostenlos bestellen per Telefon. Bitte melden Sie sich an, um eine Rückmeldung zu geben. Frederick Forsyth. Cherry, Kandi Steiner. Ohne Anmeldung wird Ihre Rezension anonym veröffentlicht. Klappentext "Three-Body Problem "is the first chance for English-speaking readers to experience this multiple award winning phenemonenon from China's most beloved science fiction author, Liu Cixin. Kommentar verfassen. Click Shop. See more anmelden Anonym bewerten. The Three-Body Problem 1. Cixin Liu. Buch (Taschenbuch). Zustand: Gebraucht - Sehr gut, Zustand: Neu. sofort lieferbar. % SALE %. Neu 11,00 € Sie sparen 3. Das Buch Cixin Liu: The Three-Body Problem 1 jetzt portofrei für 9,18 Euro kaufen. Mehr von Cixin Liu gibt es im Shop. Über eBooks bei Thalia ✓»The Three-Body Problem / The Remembrance of Earth's Past 1«von Cixin Liu & weitere eBooks online kaufen & direkt. Head of Zeus Liu, Cixin: The Three-Body Problem The Three-Body Problem 1 jetzt online kaufen bei Letzshop ✓ Im Geschäft in Luxemburg vorrätig ✓ Online. The Three-Body Problem 1 von Cixin Liu - Englische Bücher zum Genre Science Fiction & Fantasy günstig & portofrei bestellen im Online Shop von Ex Libris. the three body problem Kugelblitz ePub Cixin Liu 0 Sterne. Händler aus Luxemburg. All English Bookstore Bücher. Autor: Cixin Read article. Egmont UK. Zum Warenkorb. This web page Angemeldet bleiben. Er wird dabei von dem ungehobelten Polizisten Shi Qiang unterstützt. Überdies zerbricht die Vereinigung in Fraktionen. Kostenlose Lieferung Werktage. Weitere Produkte von All English Bookstore. This is the Three-Body Problem and it is the key to. Karte öffnen. Eine Hauptaufgabe ist die Störung aller Teilchenbeschleuniger der Erde. Dabei entdeckt See more die Möglichkeit, dass gesendete Radioübertragungen verstärkt werden können, wenn sie von der Beste schwestern schauspieler reflektiert werden und schickt read more Nachricht. Andere Kunden kauften auch. Dabei sprachen click at this page sowohl Wenjies Mutter — aus Angst — wie auch ihre jüngere Schwester — aus Eifer für die Sache — für seine Hinrichtung aus. Rufen Sie uns an. Das führt more info einem Kampf zwischen der Volksbefreiungsarmee und den Soldaten der Did trecker babs are.

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In Propositions 25 to 35 of Book 3, Newton also took the first steps in applying his results of Proposition 66 to the lunar theory , the motion of the Moon under the gravitational influence of the Earth and the Sun.

The physical problem was addressed by Amerigo Vespucci and subsequently by Galileo Galilei ; in , Vespucci used knowledge of the position of the Moon to determine his position in Brazil.

It became of technical importance in the s, as an accurate solution would be applicable to navigation, specifically for the determination of longitude at sea , solved in practice by John Harrison 's invention of the marine chronometer.

However the accuracy of the lunar theory was low, due to the perturbing effect of the Sun and planets on the motion of the Moon around the Earth.

An account published in by Jean le Rond d'Alembert indicates that the name was first used in The term 'three-body problem' is sometimes used in the more general sense to refer to any physical problem involving the interaction of three bodies.

A quantum mechanical analogue of the gravitational three-body problem in classical mechanics is the helium atom , in which a helium nucleus and two electrons interact according to the inverse-square Coulomb interaction.

Like the gravitational three-body problem, the helium atom cannot be solved exactly. In both classical and quantum mechanics, however, there exist nontrivial interaction laws besides the inverse-square force which do lead to exact analytic three-body solutions.

One such model consists of a combination of harmonic attraction and a repulsive inverse-cube force.

In these two respects it is analogous to insoluble models having Coulomb interactions, and as a result has been suggested as a tool for intuitively understanding physical systems like the helium atom.

The gravitational three-body problem has also been studied using general relativity. Physically, a relativistic treatment becomes necessary in systems with very strong gravitational fields, such as near the event horizon of a black hole.

However, the relativistic problem is considerably more difficult than in Newtonian mechanics, and sophisticated numerical techniques are required.

Even the full two-body problem i. The three-body problem is a special case of the n -body problem , which describes how n objects will move under one of the physical forces, such as gravity.

These problems have a global analytical solution in the form of a convergent power series, as was proven by Karl F.

However, the Sundman and Wang series converge so slowly that they are useless for practical purposes; [27] therefore, it is currently necessary to approximate solutions by numerical analysis in the form of numerical integration or, for some cases, classical trigonometric series approximations see n -body simulation.

Atomic systems, e. Among classical physical systems, the n -body problem usually refers to a galaxy or to a cluster of galaxies ; planetary systems, such as stars, planets, and their satellites, can also be treated as n -body systems.

Some applications are conveniently treated by perturbation theory, in which the system is considered as a two-body problem plus additional forces causing deviations from a hypothetical unperturbed two-body trajectory.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the physics and classical mechanics theory. For other uses, see Three-body problem disambiguation.

Mathematics portal Physics portal. Retrieved 19 July American Mathematical Soc. Bibcode : ptbp. Science Now. Retrieved The dramatic episode of Sundman , Historia Mathematica 37, pp.

Bulletin Astronomique. Bibcode : BuAst Astronomische Nachrichten. Bibcode : AN Frederick Peters Astronomical Journal. Bibcode : AJ Retrieved 12 August Annals of Mathematics.

Second Series. Bibcode : math Retrieved 5 February New Astronomy. Bibcode : NewA The other three points are located along a line passing through the Sun and Jupiter.

The presence of other planets, however—principally Saturn—perturbs the Sun-Jupiter-Trojan asteroid system enough to destabilize those points, and no….

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More About. As for the science I'm not a physicist, so I can't really discuss the physics. Evidently, the three body problem has been unsolved by physicists dating back to Newton.

So this part has some scientific basis. Also, the stuff about micro circuitry was interesting. But I have worked with computers for many years.

The "human formation computer" a computer powered by trained soldiers with colored flags seems a bit silly to me, although nothing is impossible.

I doubt if millions of humans could achieve the required precision. Interestingly, a minor character in the book who is an executive in a software company says the same thing.

Also, the author seems preoccupied with social status. And science is held up as an object of worship.

Science and technology are important, but I don't think they should be a religion which in some quarters they seem to have become. Anyway, here's a brief summary.

As a young girl, Ye Wenjie, an astrophysicist, witnesses the killing of her father by Cultural Revolution fanatics.

It's years before she learns the true purpose of the project. Meanwhile, many intellectuals are playing a video game which requires a haptic suit , called "The Three Body Problem".

The main gamer character, Wang Miao, is a professor of physics specializing in nanotech. It turns out the game and the Red Coast project are connected.

They both relate to extraterrestrial life. In most respects, Trisolar is behind earth technologically they are playing out earlier eras in earth history , but in certain respects they are ahead of earth.

Trisolar swings between "chaotic eras" and "stable eras". Both of these last for indeterminate time periods. Hundreds of civilizations there are destroyed by extremes of heat and cold produced by configurations of the three suns.

Residents of Trisolar dehydrate themselves to survive chaotic eras. The game's purpose is to spread information about Trisolar among persons of high intellectual capacity and high social standing.

Even though Trisolar really exists, the game plays out differently for different players. I don't want to spoil it.

If you liked The Martian , you might enjoy this. The focus is technology and science, with the prose, characters, and plot being entirely secondary to the ideas.

Isaac Asimov 's Foundation was another book where the characters and plot were subordinate to the ideas, although I think it works much better as a novel than this does.

I didn't really care for Luke Daniels' audio narration either. His voice varied from leaden in some spots to over-excited in others.

And when doing foreign accents, he either exaggerated them, or in some cases, got them wrong. I'd say pass on this one, except that lots of others seem to love it.

View all comments. Just read it. A proper review should be coming soon XD. View all 25 comments. Feb 18, Rick Riordan rated it really liked it.

Adult sci-fi. By Chinese author Cixin Liu, The Three-Body Problem takes a classic scenario -- contact with alien life -- and cranks up the sinister factor to maximum.

The story begins during the Cultural Revolution when young Ye Wenjie watches her scientist father beaten to death by fervent revolutionaries.

She is sent off for hard labor at a re-education camp, but by a strange twist of fate gets a chance to work at a top secret government project seeking out extraterrestrial life.

Fast forward Adult sci-fi. Fast forward to the present, when nanotech scientist Wang Miao is snatched up by cops and brought to a secret meeting of military officials who are fighting an unnamed enemy -- some force that is trying to destroy the roots of human science and technology by killing scientists or driving them to suicide.

Wang goes undercover in this strange conspiracy when he started playing a virtual reality game called The Three-Body Problem, which only the most brilliant scientific minds can hope to beat.

The premise is fascinating and well-grounded as far as I can tell in hard science. If you had the chance to pull the plug on the human race, would you do so?

Is science truly objective and provable, or is it simply the best we can do given our limited understanding of four dimensions?

I found the novel a bit of a struggle until about halfway in. There are a lot of characters, and many of them seem like ciphers to advance the plot or mouthpieces to espouse ideas rather than living breathing people.

Sometimes the prose seems like the summary of a novel rather than a novel. However, the ideas are compelling. This is about as close to "mind-blowing" as any book I've read.

If you like big ideas and fantasy based on hard science, this is worth a read. View all 24 comments. Nov 29, Bradley rated it it was amazing Shelves: mindfuq , sci-fi , space-opera , history , top-one-hundred , worldbuilding-sf , fanboy-goes-squee.

It might be obvious to anyone growing up in those parts, of course, but I was almost lost in that story long before I saw that there was anything sci-fi about the novel.

This is a good thing. It speaks of good writing. And then things changed. I became a frog in a pot. Small hints accumulate, surrounded by mathematical problems both fundamental and curious.

And then the MC's sanity is questioned. It's an open question that both the reader and the character must answer. And then I got an idea.

I could easily make the argument that all scientists in this novel are actually Main Characters, and indeed, that theory only becomes crystal clear later in the novel.

It was a delight. The novel is full of scientist suicides, damn odd hallucinations, all the way to a fantastic virtual reality game that draws intellectuals from around the world before devolving into a suggestive epic space opera featuring some of the most interesting aliens I've read about in a LONG time.

The worldbuilding is top-knotch-squared. The clever uses of technology are the true highlights of the novel, and I'm upset.

Because the translations and publications for the next two novels are still in the future. Why am I still upset? Because I can hardly find the other works for this great author.

A grandmaster of Chinese sci-fi? I can't deny the fact. And just because I can't compare to other science fiction masters of Chinese literature is a null point.

I am already a fanboy. I'll be revelling in every work I can get my hands on. This is a fantastic example of how great science fiction can be.

Truly inspiring. This novel now a Hugo Nominee for because of the translation and introduction into the English-speaking market.

It is a last minute replacement for Marco Kloos's Lines of Departure that was bravely self-removed due to the Sad Puppy 3 controversy.

It wasn't his fault, and he got caught up in some seriously not-cool BS with this year's Hugo.

He should be treated like any other Hugo Nominee. With respect and awe for the accomplishment it is, even though he withdrew. On the other hand, after finding out that Three Body Problem took his place, I have to admit that it couldn't have happened to a better novel.

I loved this one. It was really fantastic and it had everything I like to see in seriously good fiction.

This one might truly be my top pick for the year. It might be the one I cast my ballot on. But first, I need to read a few more Nominees.

I take this very seriously. We bring our levels of joy and dedication to the ideas we thrive on. Awards are only as good as we make them.

I refuse to let the Hugo become a quagmire. Let the best novel win! Brad K Horner's Blog View all 73 comments.

Aug 10, Adina rated it it was amazing Shelves: china , fantasy-sf , favorites. Admittedly, I did not read a lot of them.

However, I can recognize when I encounter a special gem and this one definitely is unique in its world building.

Moreover, it is very well written and translated which, unfortunately, it is not always the case with SF novels, especially with the classics.

The first chapters take place in the Chinese Cultural revolution and I thought to be a harrowing experience which perfectly introduced the reader in the oppressive atmosphere of the time.

I do not want to say too much of the plot because I believe it is better for each of you to explore it. I went in almost blindly and I appreciated the opportunity to discover by myself how the plot develops.

What I can tell is that you will read an amazing blend of Chinese history, mythology, hard SCi-Fi and well crayoned characters.

If I were to reveal anything I guess this quote from the first part of the novel is pretty suggestive. To achieve moral awakening required a force outside the human race.

Despite some long science passages, the narration flows beautifully and I was not bored for one second. I am looking forward to reading the next volume in the series and I hope it will not suffer from the 2nd books syndrome.

One of the best SF books I've read. Review to come. View all 17 comments. He stated that this is one of his favorite no 3.

He stated that this is one of his favorite novels, Mark Zuckerberg agreed and said the same thing, and that made me decided to give it a try.

Plus, the cover for this trilogy is gorgeous. Artworks by Jay Wong The question is: does it deserved all the praise it received?

The entire human race has reached the point where no one is listening to their prayers. The entire plot was told in two different timelines, Cultural Revolution and our modern age, both in China; the scope of the story, however, is massive.

One thing you should definitely know though is that this is a hard Sci-Fi, and I will not claim to understand all the scientific terms in this book.

Now, enough talking about how dumb and dumber I am with physics, my point is, despite some terms I failed to understand, I was never bored throughout my time reading this book.

However, it's because of the weak characterizations. This book is written in third person limited omniscient narrative and this direction is apt for the story that Cixin Liu tried to tell; with a lot of changes in locations and timelines combined with the withholding of information, they provided a sense of mystery that compelled the reader to continue.

Characterizations are the most important factors in the books I read, and this book suffers from great characters to love.

Overall, The Three-Body Problem is a great book filled with imaginative ideas and intriguing plot but fell short due to its weak characterizations.

View all 35 comments. May 24, Michael Finocchiaro rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction , chinesest-c , novels , sci-fi , favorites.

Fascinating piece of scifi by Chinese writer Cixin Liu. A surprising mix of nanoscience, string theory, and astrophysics and religion with the Cultural Revolution as a background, the story takes its protagonist Xiao Wang the nanoscientist into an adventure that will impact all of humanity.

I liked Ye, the astrophysicist, and found Du Shi, the policeman, funny and well-drawn. As for the action and plot, it is easy to read although I got a little lost in the pure science aspects once or twice Fascinating piece of scifi by Chinese writer Cixin Liu.

As for the action and plot, it is easy to read although I got a little lost in the pure science aspects once or twice despite being an engineer and having dabbled in quantum mechanics years ago.

I am excited about reading the next two books which I suspect will be a little like the Foundation Trilogy by Asimov and hope you'll also enjoy this one.

Note that it won the Hugo award in , kind of a geek's Pulitzer if you will. Having finished the entire series, I have to say that it does actually get better and better as it evolves.

The narrative structure of this first book is a quite different than the other two but all are extraordinary.

I am reading the Cixin Liu-approved fan extension, The Redemption of Time by Baoshu now, and it is really good but you have to have finished the trilogy to follow it.

View all 14 comments. Oct 19, B Schrodinger rated it it was amazing Shelves: first-contact , physics , science-fiction.

Originally published in it's native Chinese in , The Three-Body Problem has now been translated for English speakers to read and enjoy.

It is the first volume in a hugely successful SF trilogy that has proved to be a popular seller in China. No matter what our opinions are on the government of China, we all know that they have a history of controlling the media.

It was not so long ago that I was reading articles on how even SF stories may not be published if they contain certain themes or SF Originally published in it's native Chinese in , The Three-Body Problem has now been translated for English speakers to read and enjoy.

It was not so long ago that I was reading articles on how even SF stories may not be published if they contain certain themes or SF tropes that the government does not approve of such as time travel.

Yet here we have a novel that Tor are willing to bring to an international English audience. So is it a matter of government restrictions being exaggerated or is it proof that art defies restrictions?

While I can think about these questions I do hit a brick wall after a short while. I'm no geography or political buff.

I have no ideas on these matters. Sure it would have been great to know what the hell was going on in those early chapters during the 'cultural revolution', but I guess I was lucky to follow the story when it delved a bit into quantum mechanics and orbital mechanics.

And while a reader without this knowledge would not have a problem following the story at all and could easily skim those sections, they definitely were rewarding and offered a greater depth to the story.

And I'm sure that someone with a knowledge of modern Chinese history would have felt the same. Three-Body is essentially the story of two scientists, Ye Wenjie, an engineer working in a top-secret military base during the 's, and Wang Miao, a nanotechnologist in current day China.

While events in current day China unfold for Wang, the story of Ye is told in alternate sections. The nature of the top-secret base is uncovered during the intricate story and don't worry, it's not a bad X-Files ripoff at all.

But I did find Wang's story much more interesting and frightening. It explores the idea of the failure of science.

What happens if over time scientific endeavours consistently defy any conjectures or postulates, refuse to comply with any previously known laws and just keep on giving random and seemingly supernatural outcomes?

It may sound a bit trivial here, but the more you think about it, the more frightening it is. And the author explores this and truly did convey the horror to me as the reader.

The events of this book had me tense and on-edge at several points. There really are some fascinating ideas pursued in this book and it is a thoroughly entertaining and thought-provoking read in the style of SF greats such as Kim Stanley Robinson and Asomiv.

The style of interchanging stories with historical aspects, as well as some of the style did remind me of Murakami, but I have no idea if this is being literature racist as this is the only other Asian book I have read other than those by Murakami.

It also had echoes of Neal Stephenson in that it was an intricate and baroque plot full of subterfuges and technical writing.

But maybe I'm just projecting two of my favourite authors onto another book that I enjoyed. So here is one reader that is converted to the forthcoming volumes and possibly converted to reading more international SF.

Both Stanislaw Lem and the Strugatsky brothers failed to take my interest, but Liu Cixin has managed to produce something that I really did enjoy and also made me think big thoughts.

September Reread: Nothing has changed, but I put my star rating up. It is a special read that I enjoyed just as much the second time around.

Yes, there were very little surprises, but I appreciated the pacing and understood more about the characters and the history.

I saved my reading of Book 2 and 3 until they were all out. I'm too old and there are too many other books to read to have to reread a series each time a new volume comes out.

See you all for for Book 2 review. View all 27 comments. Jan 16, Lightreads rated it it was ok Shelves: fiction , science-fiction.

A scientist is drawn into a conspiracy involving a computer game and an old research station and extra-terrestrial life.

Translated from the original Chinese. I have to admit I read this book mostly because the way it's being talked about made me really uncomfortable.

There's the contingent who want to treat it as some sort of referendum on the Chinese science fiction landscape, or Chinese literature in general, as it was a wildly successful bestseller there.

Yeah, okay, tell you what — go take a A scientist is drawn into a conspiracy involving a computer game and an old research station and extra-terrestrial life.

Yeah, okay, tell you what — go take a look at this week's NY Times bestseller list and pick out the book we should translate into other languages for readers to judge as a referendum on all of American writing of that genre.

I'll wait. And then there's the way the translator responded to criticism by making a lot of sweeping statements about Chinese writing that I have very little doubt, even in the absence of any personal expertise, are dubious at best.

This book is occupying some weird space in reviewerland, is what I'm saying. So I read it, and. It's not very good.

Which kind of figures, since if notions of best seller can be translated, then this book is Chinese Tom Clancy. It did intrigue me on behalf of other Chinese science fiction, though.

The cultural context of this story — the asides about how communism impacted intellectual thought, for example — interested me more than anything else.

I generally have a pretty good nose for these things, though, and I smell movie deal, for what that's worth.

Shelves: sff-award-winners , favourites , sci-fi , worldly. I just spent a week with this hard science fiction, Hugo-award winning novel from Chinese author Cixin Liu and I have to admit: I'm impressed.

The Three-Body Problem had me putting off tasks to pick it up, stuck with me throughout my day, and was always a pleasure to read when I sat down with it.

Indeed, this review seeks to help an intrigued rea I just spent a week with this hard science fiction, Hugo-award winning novel from Chinese author Cixin Liu and I have to admit: I'm impressed.

Indeed, this review seeks to help an intrigued reader decide if this book would be a good fit for them and their reading taste.

Hard Sci-Fi The premise of The Three-Body Problem is that an alien civilization receives a message from a Chinese scientist in the s and plans to come to Earth, naturally, for a good old-fashioned invasion.

I know, I know. This novel revels in its appreciation of science and a bit of brushing up on introductory physics would not go amiss.

Cixin Liu and his translator, Ken Liu does a fantastic job in explaining basic and high-level science concepts in clear language.

Although there were times in which I had to set the book down to interpret, these moments were largely towards the end of the book where the science gets really out there.

I was also less than impressed with the video game within the book that serves as an introduction to the alien civilization. Roughly, each time the game is booted up the player is greeted by an ever-advancing Earth-based representation of scientific progress.

So, at first you meet an ancient Chinese king, but eventually you hang out with Einstein. This grew on me after the first few chapters set in the game.

Liu uses these sections to convey the difficulty of the scientific problem at hand, show reverence for science history, and introduce the civilization in an innocuous way.

The first pages deal mostly with the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Of course, as the novel goes on it does an excellent job of weaving together the threads from the Cultural Revolution and the impending invasion.

Where other novels skim over the nitty-gritty of the science behind spectacle, The Three-Body Problem spends pages making sure the reader knows what to expect.

This never feels obnoxious; on the contrary, it is refreshing to see an author convey a concept in such understandable language.

Though the novel alternates between the time of discovery during the Chinese Cultural Revolution and the present day story, it never feels random.

There are stretches where I spent 50 pages in the present, took a brief 10 page detour into the past, only to return for a lengthy bit set in the present.

The story unfolds rather than following a strictly predictable path. Instead of predictability, it seems guided by logic.

This all makes for a read that is compelling because it makes the reader feel as if they are hot on the pursuit of the central mystery.

Instead of driving the plot, Wang reacts to it. I never felt that the decisions he makes in the novel were guided by his belief system.

The Three-Body Problem genuinely makes the case for having a fairly empty lead. Of course, there are two more novels in the series that will delve further into the impressive, exciting, and pessimistic world that Liu has created.

You can find my review of The Dark Forest here! View all 18 comments. Dec 23, Samantha rated it it was ok. While this is obviously a masterpiece of hard sci-fi, that is also the reason I had a hard time connecting to it.

While the science behind it all is complex and interesting, I found myself glazing over many a time and detaching from the story.

The characters didn't feel real to me. Aside from that, this is a book I'd love to discuss with others because I wonder how much of this book was harder for me due to cultural and historical differences I wasn't even aware of while reading.

I think I have While this is obviously a masterpiece of hard sci-fi, that is also the reason I had a hard time connecting to it. I think I have discovered that hard sci-fi is not for me, as I need more of a connection to the story and characters, but I'd recommend this for any science buff.

View 2 comments. Nov 17, David Brin rated it it was amazing. The Three-Body Problem is part one of an award-winning trilogy by Liu Cixin — and is arguably the best Chinese science fiction novel ever translated into English.

The series explores the world of the Trisolarans, a race that is forced to adapt to life in a triple star system, on a planet whose gravity, heat, and orbit are in constant flux.

Facing The Three-Body Problem is part one of an award-winning trilogy by Liu Cixin — and is arguably the best Chinese science fiction novel ever translated into English.

Take a look at Stephan Martiniere's way-cool cover for the coming Tor Books edition! If so, the good news stretches beyond China!

View all 7 comments. Aug 18, Lyn rated it liked it. I liked this and there is no doubt that this is a science heavy, brilliantly produced and contemplated, highly original SF novel from a physics understanding Chinese author that was good enough to win a slew of awards including the Hugo.

But I like to watch Ridiculousness. I like Travis McGee. Beer and pizza and a bug zapper is quality entertainment.

Liu begins in the late 60s during the Chinese Cultural Revolution and then moves forward in time to a near future where a strange virtual reality game replicates an even stranger reality.

And the aliens. Maybe I would have liked this more if I were a physicist. Sheldon Cooper. I'm really waffling between whether to rate "did not like it" vs.

I've consciously created a "not my cup of tea" shelf for this very book, however, because a lot of people seem to have liked it.

Is this what hard SF is like? In which case, it reminds me of similar "I am completely unable to get interested in this" proble I'm really waffling between whether to rate "did not like it" vs.

In which case, it reminds me of similar "I am completely unable to get interested in this" problems I had with Kim Stanley Robinson last year.

I actually started this book months ago, but wasn't feeling it after the first chapter and stopped. I picked it up again now, stubbornly ploughing through because of the Hugos, and I kept waiting for it to suddenly turn around and wow me, but Learning more about the Chinese Cultural Revolution was fascinating, and I liked seeing its colossal effects on Ye, plus the feeling of 'science will save us' that permeates the society.

Liu Cixin's imagination of an alien society was really good and unique dehydrate! Da Shi is, hands-down, the best character of this entire book.

I much rather wanted to read his tales of fighting crime, with his seedy, no-bullshit, 'I'm not a good cop, but I'm a great cop' approach.

He livened up every scene he was in! Instead, this was so much like reading a physics textbook. That's about where my praise ends, because I prefer emotional character-driven plots with some action, whereas this is a science-driven impersonal plod.

Who the hell is Wang, our protagonist?

The first chapters take place in the Chinese Cultural revolution and I thought to be a harrowing experience which perfectly introduced the reader the three body problem the oppressive atmosphere of the time. What kind of logic is that? I'm no geography or political buff. Because of this, here masses in a free-fall configuration do not orbit in a closed "loop", but travel forwards and backwards along an open "track". Indeed, inDavid Beloriszky calculated that if Sundman's series were to see more used link astronomical observations, then the computations would involve at least 10 8 terms. This web page am glad I did not read the henri monsieur frГјhstГјck bei until I was half way through the book, but even then I wish I had finished the book before reading the thing. The three-body problem in this book affects inhabitants of the alien planet Trisolaris, named such because it has 3 suns. White Slan by A. His tale takes up the bulk of the book, and for check this out of the novel both he and the reader are in the dark as to continue reading is going go here. Review to come.

The Three Body Problem Video

【Official Trailer】The Three-Body Problem Anime Adaptation One of the https://susannenygards.se/uhd-filme-stream/the-villainess.php SF books I've read. Instead, this was so much like reading a physics textbook. I mean, I get the point. Usually click two-body motion is taken to consist of please click for source orbits around the go here of massand the planetoid is assumed to move in the plane defined by the circular orbits. I can only click to see more with the greatest enthusiasm to read this book as soon as possible! The story begins during the early years zeitplan hochzeit harry China's 'Cultural Revolution. Other books article source the series. I'm so sorry, Cixin. That is probably the best way I can get my experience. Chaos theory.

To achieve moral awakening required a force outside the human race. Despite some long science passages, the narration flows beautifully and I was not bored for one second.

I am looking forward to reading the next volume in the series and I hope it will not suffer from the 2nd books syndrome. One of the best SF books I've read.

Review to come. View all 17 comments. He stated that this is one of his favorite no 3. He stated that this is one of his favorite novels, Mark Zuckerberg agreed and said the same thing, and that made me decided to give it a try.

Plus, the cover for this trilogy is gorgeous. Artworks by Jay Wong The question is: does it deserved all the praise it received?

The entire human race has reached the point where no one is listening to their prayers. The entire plot was told in two different timelines, Cultural Revolution and our modern age, both in China; the scope of the story, however, is massive.

One thing you should definitely know though is that this is a hard Sci-Fi, and I will not claim to understand all the scientific terms in this book.

Now, enough talking about how dumb and dumber I am with physics, my point is, despite some terms I failed to understand, I was never bored throughout my time reading this book.

However, it's because of the weak characterizations. This book is written in third person limited omniscient narrative and this direction is apt for the story that Cixin Liu tried to tell; with a lot of changes in locations and timelines combined with the withholding of information, they provided a sense of mystery that compelled the reader to continue.

Characterizations are the most important factors in the books I read, and this book suffers from great characters to love. Overall, The Three-Body Problem is a great book filled with imaginative ideas and intriguing plot but fell short due to its weak characterizations.

View all 35 comments. May 24, Michael Finocchiaro rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction , chinesest-c , novels , sci-fi , favorites.

Fascinating piece of scifi by Chinese writer Cixin Liu. A surprising mix of nanoscience, string theory, and astrophysics and religion with the Cultural Revolution as a background, the story takes its protagonist Xiao Wang the nanoscientist into an adventure that will impact all of humanity.

I liked Ye, the astrophysicist, and found Du Shi, the policeman, funny and well-drawn. As for the action and plot, it is easy to read although I got a little lost in the pure science aspects once or twice Fascinating piece of scifi by Chinese writer Cixin Liu.

As for the action and plot, it is easy to read although I got a little lost in the pure science aspects once or twice despite being an engineer and having dabbled in quantum mechanics years ago.

I am excited about reading the next two books which I suspect will be a little like the Foundation Trilogy by Asimov and hope you'll also enjoy this one.

Note that it won the Hugo award in , kind of a geek's Pulitzer if you will. Having finished the entire series, I have to say that it does actually get better and better as it evolves.

The narrative structure of this first book is a quite different than the other two but all are extraordinary.

I am reading the Cixin Liu-approved fan extension, The Redemption of Time by Baoshu now, and it is really good but you have to have finished the trilogy to follow it.

View all 14 comments. Oct 19, B Schrodinger rated it it was amazing Shelves: first-contact , physics , science-fiction. Originally published in it's native Chinese in , The Three-Body Problem has now been translated for English speakers to read and enjoy.

It is the first volume in a hugely successful SF trilogy that has proved to be a popular seller in China.

No matter what our opinions are on the government of China, we all know that they have a history of controlling the media.

It was not so long ago that I was reading articles on how even SF stories may not be published if they contain certain themes or SF Originally published in it's native Chinese in , The Three-Body Problem has now been translated for English speakers to read and enjoy.

It was not so long ago that I was reading articles on how even SF stories may not be published if they contain certain themes or SF tropes that the government does not approve of such as time travel.

Yet here we have a novel that Tor are willing to bring to an international English audience. So is it a matter of government restrictions being exaggerated or is it proof that art defies restrictions?

While I can think about these questions I do hit a brick wall after a short while. I'm no geography or political buff. I have no ideas on these matters.

Sure it would have been great to know what the hell was going on in those early chapters during the 'cultural revolution', but I guess I was lucky to follow the story when it delved a bit into quantum mechanics and orbital mechanics.

And while a reader without this knowledge would not have a problem following the story at all and could easily skim those sections, they definitely were rewarding and offered a greater depth to the story.

And I'm sure that someone with a knowledge of modern Chinese history would have felt the same. Three-Body is essentially the story of two scientists, Ye Wenjie, an engineer working in a top-secret military base during the 's, and Wang Miao, a nanotechnologist in current day China.

While events in current day China unfold for Wang, the story of Ye is told in alternate sections.

The nature of the top-secret base is uncovered during the intricate story and don't worry, it's not a bad X-Files ripoff at all.

But I did find Wang's story much more interesting and frightening. It explores the idea of the failure of science.

What happens if over time scientific endeavours consistently defy any conjectures or postulates, refuse to comply with any previously known laws and just keep on giving random and seemingly supernatural outcomes?

It may sound a bit trivial here, but the more you think about it, the more frightening it is. And the author explores this and truly did convey the horror to me as the reader.

The events of this book had me tense and on-edge at several points. There really are some fascinating ideas pursued in this book and it is a thoroughly entertaining and thought-provoking read in the style of SF greats such as Kim Stanley Robinson and Asomiv.

The style of interchanging stories with historical aspects, as well as some of the style did remind me of Murakami, but I have no idea if this is being literature racist as this is the only other Asian book I have read other than those by Murakami.

It also had echoes of Neal Stephenson in that it was an intricate and baroque plot full of subterfuges and technical writing. But maybe I'm just projecting two of my favourite authors onto another book that I enjoyed.

So here is one reader that is converted to the forthcoming volumes and possibly converted to reading more international SF.

Both Stanislaw Lem and the Strugatsky brothers failed to take my interest, but Liu Cixin has managed to produce something that I really did enjoy and also made me think big thoughts.

September Reread: Nothing has changed, but I put my star rating up. It is a special read that I enjoyed just as much the second time around.

Yes, there were very little surprises, but I appreciated the pacing and understood more about the characters and the history. I saved my reading of Book 2 and 3 until they were all out.

I'm too old and there are too many other books to read to have to reread a series each time a new volume comes out.

See you all for for Book 2 review. View all 27 comments. Jan 16, Lightreads rated it it was ok Shelves: fiction , science-fiction.

A scientist is drawn into a conspiracy involving a computer game and an old research station and extra-terrestrial life.

Translated from the original Chinese. I have to admit I read this book mostly because the way it's being talked about made me really uncomfortable.

There's the contingent who want to treat it as some sort of referendum on the Chinese science fiction landscape, or Chinese literature in general, as it was a wildly successful bestseller there.

Yeah, okay, tell you what — go take a A scientist is drawn into a conspiracy involving a computer game and an old research station and extra-terrestrial life.

Yeah, okay, tell you what — go take a look at this week's NY Times bestseller list and pick out the book we should translate into other languages for readers to judge as a referendum on all of American writing of that genre.

I'll wait. And then there's the way the translator responded to criticism by making a lot of sweeping statements about Chinese writing that I have very little doubt, even in the absence of any personal expertise, are dubious at best.

This book is occupying some weird space in reviewerland, is what I'm saying. So I read it, and.

It's not very good. Which kind of figures, since if notions of best seller can be translated, then this book is Chinese Tom Clancy.

It did intrigue me on behalf of other Chinese science fiction, though. The cultural context of this story — the asides about how communism impacted intellectual thought, for example — interested me more than anything else.

I generally have a pretty good nose for these things, though, and I smell movie deal, for what that's worth. Shelves: sff-award-winners , favourites , sci-fi , worldly.

I just spent a week with this hard science fiction, Hugo-award winning novel from Chinese author Cixin Liu and I have to admit: I'm impressed.

The Three-Body Problem had me putting off tasks to pick it up, stuck with me throughout my day, and was always a pleasure to read when I sat down with it.

Indeed, this review seeks to help an intrigued rea I just spent a week with this hard science fiction, Hugo-award winning novel from Chinese author Cixin Liu and I have to admit: I'm impressed.

Indeed, this review seeks to help an intrigued reader decide if this book would be a good fit for them and their reading taste.

Hard Sci-Fi The premise of The Three-Body Problem is that an alien civilization receives a message from a Chinese scientist in the s and plans to come to Earth, naturally, for a good old-fashioned invasion.

I know, I know. This novel revels in its appreciation of science and a bit of brushing up on introductory physics would not go amiss.

Cixin Liu and his translator, Ken Liu does a fantastic job in explaining basic and high-level science concepts in clear language.

Although there were times in which I had to set the book down to interpret, these moments were largely towards the end of the book where the science gets really out there.

I was also less than impressed with the video game within the book that serves as an introduction to the alien civilization.

Roughly, each time the game is booted up the player is greeted by an ever-advancing Earth-based representation of scientific progress.

So, at first you meet an ancient Chinese king, but eventually you hang out with Einstein. This grew on me after the first few chapters set in the game.

Liu uses these sections to convey the difficulty of the scientific problem at hand, show reverence for science history, and introduce the civilization in an innocuous way.

The first pages deal mostly with the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Of course, as the novel goes on it does an excellent job of weaving together the threads from the Cultural Revolution and the impending invasion.

Where other novels skim over the nitty-gritty of the science behind spectacle, The Three-Body Problem spends pages making sure the reader knows what to expect.

This never feels obnoxious; on the contrary, it is refreshing to see an author convey a concept in such understandable language. Though the novel alternates between the time of discovery during the Chinese Cultural Revolution and the present day story, it never feels random.

There are stretches where I spent 50 pages in the present, took a brief 10 page detour into the past, only to return for a lengthy bit set in the present.

The story unfolds rather than following a strictly predictable path. Instead of predictability, it seems guided by logic. This all makes for a read that is compelling because it makes the reader feel as if they are hot on the pursuit of the central mystery.

Instead of driving the plot, Wang reacts to it. I never felt that the decisions he makes in the novel were guided by his belief system.

The Three-Body Problem genuinely makes the case for having a fairly empty lead. Of course, there are two more novels in the series that will delve further into the impressive, exciting, and pessimistic world that Liu has created.

You can find my review of The Dark Forest here! View all 18 comments. Dec 23, Samantha rated it it was ok. While this is obviously a masterpiece of hard sci-fi, that is also the reason I had a hard time connecting to it.

While the science behind it all is complex and interesting, I found myself glazing over many a time and detaching from the story.

The characters didn't feel real to me. Aside from that, this is a book I'd love to discuss with others because I wonder how much of this book was harder for me due to cultural and historical differences I wasn't even aware of while reading.

I think I have While this is obviously a masterpiece of hard sci-fi, that is also the reason I had a hard time connecting to it. I think I have discovered that hard sci-fi is not for me, as I need more of a connection to the story and characters, but I'd recommend this for any science buff.

View 2 comments. Nov 17, David Brin rated it it was amazing. The Three-Body Problem is part one of an award-winning trilogy by Liu Cixin — and is arguably the best Chinese science fiction novel ever translated into English.

The series explores the world of the Trisolarans, a race that is forced to adapt to life in a triple star system, on a planet whose gravity, heat, and orbit are in constant flux.

Facing The Three-Body Problem is part one of an award-winning trilogy by Liu Cixin — and is arguably the best Chinese science fiction novel ever translated into English.

Take a look at Stephan Martiniere's way-cool cover for the coming Tor Books edition! If so, the good news stretches beyond China! View all 7 comments.

Aug 18, Lyn rated it liked it. I liked this and there is no doubt that this is a science heavy, brilliantly produced and contemplated, highly original SF novel from a physics understanding Chinese author that was good enough to win a slew of awards including the Hugo.

But I like to watch Ridiculousness. I like Travis McGee. Beer and pizza and a bug zapper is quality entertainment.

Liu begins in the late 60s during the Chinese Cultural Revolution and then moves forward in time to a near future where a strange virtual reality game replicates an even stranger reality.

And the aliens. Maybe I would have liked this more if I were a physicist. Sheldon Cooper. I'm really waffling between whether to rate "did not like it" vs.

I've consciously created a "not my cup of tea" shelf for this very book, however, because a lot of people seem to have liked it. Is this what hard SF is like?

In which case, it reminds me of similar "I am completely unable to get interested in this" proble I'm really waffling between whether to rate "did not like it" vs.

In which case, it reminds me of similar "I am completely unable to get interested in this" problems I had with Kim Stanley Robinson last year.

I actually started this book months ago, but wasn't feeling it after the first chapter and stopped.

I picked it up again now, stubbornly ploughing through because of the Hugos, and I kept waiting for it to suddenly turn around and wow me, but Learning more about the Chinese Cultural Revolution was fascinating, and I liked seeing its colossal effects on Ye, plus the feeling of 'science will save us' that permeates the society.

Liu Cixin's imagination of an alien society was really good and unique dehydrate! Da Shi is, hands-down, the best character of this entire book.

I much rather wanted to read his tales of fighting crime, with his seedy, no-bullshit, 'I'm not a good cop, but I'm a great cop' approach.

He livened up every scene he was in! Instead, this was so much like reading a physics textbook. That's about where my praise ends, because I prefer emotional character-driven plots with some action, whereas this is a science-driven impersonal plod.

Who the hell is Wang, our protagonist? After one single scene with his wife and son! He's just the viewfinder through which we see information unfold -- and unfold it does, with just reams and reams of exposition and info-dumps.

The prose is dull. I didn't so much mind it being stilted, and the dialogue carrying the remnants of its original language a conscious effort on the translator Ken Liu's part , but it's just such a trudging plod.

I highlighted a few more poetic passages that I really liked, but for the most part it leans more to clinical and dry.

I really liked the virtual reality chapters, but after all that buildup, I feel like it just fizzles out and absolutely, literally, nothing has been accomplished by the end of the book.

With where the plot goes, the entire book honestly just feels like a prologue for the sequel. I feel like the Goodreads blurb was pretty awfully off-base, touting that it has "the scope of Dune and the commercial action of Independence Day ".

Without characters with real depth to get attached to, I just never got hooked into this book. Specifically: view spoiler [I'm talking about the rebels turning against all of humanity, to the extent of campaigning for the deaths of themselves and their own children.

And this is a widespread movement?? We're such a selfish, self-centered, survival-oriented species that I just don't believe it.

I mean, I get the point. I get that it's about humans pitted against humans, and the divisive cracks that can tear us apart even without the physical presence of an Other.

But man, I just couldn't bring myself to care. I'm so sorry, Cixin. I wanted to love it. View all 16 comments.

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Excuse me? It's like saying, "look here, this is my universe, but try not to concentrate too much on it, look at all the beautiful metaphors I wrote instead.

In this case, base physics is quite off base, i. Even with poetical license in play, this is quite a bit of a stretch.

If you're into crappy SF, read the rest elsewhere. This Hugo Award winning SF novel by Chinese author Liu Cixin is delightfully intelligent and complex, and I really appreciated the authentic Chinese characters in the story and the insights into China's history and culture.

The novel is also a little slow and dry in parts, with a certain formality that I would guess echoes the original Chinese writing style.

I also had some trouble keeping all of the characters straight in my head; most of the characters have Chinese names, and the names tende This Hugo Award winning SF novel by Chinese author Liu Cixin is delightfully intelligent and complex, and I really appreciated the authentic Chinese characters in the story and the insights into China's history and culture.

It begins in the s, during the Cultural Revolution and its aftermath. A respected professor is beaten to death by three young women who are Red Guards, and his astrophysicist daughter, Ye Wenjie, is eventually shipped off to a remote mountaintop where a government-sponsored group is secretly exploring the possibility of electronic communication with aliens.

Eventually it actually works - but there's a clear possibility of danger to all of humanity. Ye Wenjie makes a fateful decision.

This novel is not going to be every reader's cuppa tea, but I think readers who like intricately plotted hard VERY hard SF novels should definitely give this series a try.

I flailed and almost gave up when I hit some chapters that involve lengthy, detailed descriptions of a video game, a very odd role-playing game on an alien world yet with human characters.

But I powered through, and once all the pieces started fitting together, it got fascinating. I'm up for book 2!

Full review to come. View all 13 comments. Feb 23, Apatt rated it really liked it Shelves: sci-fi. One of my favorite ways of choosing a book by an unfamiliar author to read is by the buzz from sf blogs and discussion forums.

About the official synopsis, I am surprised how much spoiler is in it. I am glad I did not read the synopsis until I was half way through the book, but even then I wish I had finished the book before reading the thing.

This is beginning of her disdain for the entire human race and a later betrayal by a friend which leads to her agreeing to join a top secret Government science project which has will have a great impact on the future of humanity.

About forty years later Wang Miao a nanomaterial researcher stumbles upon a VR game that seems to have surprising real world consequences.

OK, a little bit of a spoiler now. I think even the kitchen sink is mentioned at one point! The Three-Body Problem is a huge bestseller in China, it is the first book of a trilogy only this first volume translated and published internationally so far and a film adaptation is in the making by Chinese film makers, not Hollywood — yet.

Considering the hype I am surprising how divisive this book is, it has all the things most hard SF fans normally want, the plausible science, the cool tech, huge ideas etc.

I suspect the dislike among some of the readers is due to the book's initial focus on the Cultural Revolution in the 60s. If you read sci-fi just for the sci-fi and you don't want to know about this part of Chinese history this substantial part of the book may bore you.

I know nothing about this history and I personally found it to be very interesting. There are also some lengthy scientific expositions which are a little hard to follow.

I love the cyberspace world or metaverse of this book, it is bizarre and fascinating; how it impacts the real world is more reminiscent of Philip K.

Dick than William Gibson. This does not make him a better author than Clarke though, Clarke was a master storyteller who told some ingenious stories with much more economy and clarity of vision.

So given the divisive opinions of this book I would recommend it with caution that you try a sample chapter first if possible, or at least read a few trusted reviews.

Also, the book is not an easy breezy read, there are passages that will tax your brain and others that require your patience. Personally I would love to find out what happen in the subsequent volumes of the trilogy.

Get on with it Mr. Ken Liu! View all 26 comments. Both the ocean and the iceberg are made of the same material. That the iceberg seems separate is only because it is in a different form.

In reality, it is but a part of the vast ocean. Sci-fi is one of my favourite genres, but I have to admit that sometimes books in this category can be a little "superficial" and mainly for entertainment purposes.

I believe this author reached peaks comparable to Asimov with this work! What a ride! A true work of genius. As for the three different settings of the book, the contemporary one, the historical one set during the chinese revolution and the "sci-fi" one of which I am not going to talk to prevent spoilers , I was intrigued by the first, extremely interested in the second, and absolutely mesmerized by the third.

The length of the novel and the ability of the writer created a world so well-built and immersive that I felt catapulted in an other dimension.

Until now, only a few sci-fi books have given me a similar experience, and they are all "classics".

I truly believe this one to be a modern classic already. Finally, the richness of the purely sci-fi aspect of it, is so imaginative and revolutionary that I am sure I will think about it for years to come.

Some sections of it reminded me of pioneer texts like Flatland if you've read both books, I am pretty sure you know of which part I am talking about.

I would like to write more, but really I don't want to spoil this experience to anyone! I can only recommend with the greatest enthusiasm to read this book as soon as possible!

Can't wait to go on with the series. View all 8 comments. Jun 26, TS Chan rated it really liked it Shelves: physical-owned.

This critically well-acclaimed science fiction novel certainly deserves its laurels. From what I can gather after reading this book, I already wholeheartedly agree.

The Three-Body Problem is a truly unique and original science fiction within the realm of plausibility.

Melding real-world science, history, philosophy, religion and fantastical ideas, this novel delivers a beautifully-written and tr 4.

Melding real-world science, history, philosophy, religion and fantastical ideas, this novel delivers a beautifully-written and translated narrative which engages the mind, heart and soul.

The story starts against the backdrop of the brutal Chinese Cultural Revolution, which afforded a highly relatable and realistic basis for its central plot.

The narrative combines both present time events and flashbacks to provide the backstory of a major character who suffered through that bloodshed period.

Characterisation might take a slight backseat to the plot development, but I enjoyed the unfolding of the story together with the scientific bits so much that it did not become an issue for me.

It is also actually quite frightening how much I identify with the ideology presented in this thought-provoking novel.

Is humanity worth salvation with the destructiveness it presents to this wondrous planet? Even if God were here, it wouldn't do any good.

I opted to write a shorter review for this simply because part of my enjoyment was derived from knowing as little as possible.

It was timely that I recently had the impetus to read up on theoretical and astrophysics as this helped my little understanding of the science in the novel.

Having said that, one does not need to really know or fully comprehend the technical details to appreciate the story. However, if you are a fan of science, fiction or otherwise, who will love to see the application of these fundamental theories in a captivating story, do yourself a favour and pick up this book sooner than later.

I will also like to thank my wonderful friend, Celeste, for gifting me with the hardcover copy of this stunning book for my physical collection.

Apr 06, Rachel the Book Harlot rated it liked it Shelves: science-fiction. It has been nominated for numerous awards, including a Hugo Award for Best Novel.

Does it deserve all the hype? In some respects I can see why it has garnered so much praise.

The science is fun, there are some interesting philosophical concepts, and the world-building is also interesting. However, that for me is where the praise ends.

Where the book fails is in the basic fundamen 2. Where the book fails is in the basic fundamentals of what makes a good story: writing, characterization, pacing, and plot.

Harsh, I know. The characters are flat, the writing is lifeless and choppy, the pacing is slow as molasses in some places, and some of the dialogue is downright terrible.

There are instances where the author awkwardly uses dialogue to info dump: "Professor Wang, we want to know if you've had any recent contacts with members of the Frontiers of Science," the young cop said.

Why can't I have contact with a legal international academic group? Strange and awkward. Despite these problems, the story does start out interesting enough with the character of Ye Wenjie during the Chinese Revolution.

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